As home quarantine continues for millions of Americans, bakers are making focaccia gardens to help pass the time -- and the eye-catching loafs might be the best thing since sliced bread.

Home bakers are loading their focaccia spreads with herbs, spices, vegetables and more, carefully placing each topping to create a tasty-looking garden landscape. From yellow-pepper sunflowers to bushes made of fresh herbs, focaccia gardens are bringing extra color to dinner tables across the globe, and lighting up social media along the way.

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Hi guys, remember my little dough 'project'?? The internet has gone mad with turning a blank bread canvas into edible art which obviously got me obsessed and had to join in🤪. It's clearly part of pandemic food trends and I am all in for a bit of #challenge so here's my attempt at creating gardenscape on flatbread (swipe to see my draft and other shots) I used a pizza dough instead of focaccia - it worked just fine👌🏼recipe below in case anyone wants it & more pics in highlights x ___________________ * 2 1/2 cups warm water * 1/4 cup sugar * 3 tsp instant yeast * 1/4 cup vegetable oil * 6 cups flour * 2 tsp salt ___________________ 1. Mix the water, sugar and yeast in a bowl. Allow the mixture to sit for a few minutes until frothy, then add in the oil. 2. In a bowl, combine the flour and the salt. Add the flour to the yeast mixture, 1/2 cup at a time, mixing well. Continue adding the flour until the dough can be pulled away from the sides of the bowl with a spatula, but the dough will still be quite sticky. 3. Grease a large bowl, then scrape the dough into the bowl. Turn the dough to coat it in oil. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and a let the dough rise at room temperature until doubled, about 1 hour. 4. Turn the dough out onto a well-floured surface. Pull the dough around to the bottom, stretching it to create a smooth ball. Cut the dough into 3 equal portions. Roll the dough out and play with your favourite vegetables🍅🥦🥕🧅🌶🍆 5. Preheat the oven to 240C and bake for 10 minutes or until golden. #bread #food #foodporn #pizza #veganpizza #instafood #italianfood #bread #vegetables #foccaciagarden #gardenscape #flatbreadpizza #homemade #cucinaitaliana #foodblogger #italy #foodie #foodblog #bakery #pizzeria #cucina #trending #vegetarian #foodtrends #delicious #pan #recipe #baking #bakingbread

A post shared by Food Actually (@lcpcookery) on May 13, 2020 at 11:54am PDT

Teri Culetto is the culinarian at the heart of the trend. The self-proclaimed Vineyard Baker of Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts, has been creating art with focaccia bread as her canvas for over a year now. The idea first struck her after a fateful visit to Boston's Museum of Fine Arts in January 2019.

PHOTO: Focaccia gardens are blooming in kitchens around the world as bakers try to keep busy at home during the coronavirus pandemic.
Courtesy Teri Culetto
Focaccia gardens are blooming in kitchens around the world as bakers try to keep busy at home during the coronavirus pandemic.

"I went to see to see Van Gogh's 'Sunflowers' painting and couldn't get it out of my head," Culetto explained. "I was feeling inspired artistically, but don't really paint, so I thought I'd get baking and try to recreate the painting with vegetables and see what happens."

The mother of four was pleasantly surprised to find the grain as a perfect vehicle for her design.

"When it finished I thought, 'Wow, these colors really work on bread,'" Culetto said. "It was amazing how the browns, yellows and everything worked together."

PHOTO: Focaccia gardens are blooming in kitchens around the world as bakers try to keep busy at home during the coronavirus pandemic.
Courtesy Teri Culetto
Focaccia gardens are blooming in kitchens around the world as bakers try to keep busy at home during the coronavirus pandemic.

Culetto, 56, shared her creation with a few friends and aspiring chefs in the neighborhood who encouraged her to share the tasteful loafs on social media. She uploaded a few pictures to Instagram and shared her recipe dubbed "Vincent Van Dough", along with a few tips on best baking practices: pre-ferment the dough for more body and structure, make sure your bread is rising when applying vegetables and take your time to bring out all the flavor.

Not long after, bakers from far and wide flocked to her page, hoping to find inspiration.

The focaccia focused baker slowly saw more and more interest in her edible arrangements, but the buzz picked up noticeably in mid-March as coronavirus-related shutdowns began to keep more and more people at home.

"It's been overwhelming, you'll bring me to tears because there has been such an outpouring of interest in the last few weeks," Culetto said. "It's a really sweet thing and I think it's a bit of what we all need right now. I know we're all eventually going to get out of our houses, but I hope people won't leave their bread projects behind. Don't forget about the bread!"

Culetto added she hopes to move from focaccia to sourdough soon, a grain she's noticed many of her followers struggle with.