Drawing on the universality of love found in all faiths, "RuPaul's Drag Race" star Jackie Cox opened up to ABC's Paula Faris in the latest episode of "Faith Friday" on Instagram to talk about a more-inclusive Islam and where the intersection of pride and faith resides for her.

Jackie, who made headlines in season 12 of "RuPaul's Drag Race" earlier this year for bringing Muslim representation to the runway, is a proud Persian Canadian and told Faris she wants to provide for a more powerful, positive and empowering portrayal of Middle Eastern culture and people through her drag.

"Pride and faith are really about love and respect," Jackie said.

Of the "Stars and Stripes" episode of her season of "RuPaul's Drag Race," when Jackie wore an American flag-inspired hijab, she wrote, "The look was meant to honor my Muslim family and friends and also stand up against the Islamophobia they have faced."

View this post on Instagram

I'm here and I deserve to be in America just as much as anyone else. 💙🇺🇸❤️ @rupaulsdragrace #DragRace UPDATE: I am truly overwhelmed by the amount of love I’ve been shown the last 24 hours regarding my runway interpretation of the “Stars and Stripes” Runway. I’ve also seen a lot of debate about this look and whether I should or should not have worn this, or said what I said on the runway. To clarify my intentions, this look was meant to honor my Muslim family and friends and also stand up against the Islamophobia they have faced. As for my personal relationship with Islam: I am agnostic, and my immediate family has their own, somewhat secular, interpretation of the Islamic faith. Growing up, my mother spoke to me a lot about her thoughts on Islam and her belief that it was something I shouldn’t be afraid of. It was her opinion that both the western media interpretation, and the hardline mullahs who took over Iran were the ones who were misinterpreting the faith. She instead, chose to focus her beliefs on love and charity and made a pilgrimage to Mecca in her youth. She, and her sisters, wear headscarves while in public in Iran as that is the law. In their personal lives, as seen depicted in the photographs of my aunt and mom in the US on the show, they do not wear headscarves. However; I support their freedom and choice to wear or NOT wear a headscarf, a right that I am grateful is granted here in the United States... but brings Islamophobia. I think it’s important to clarify the importance of freedom of religion versus the religious law imposed in Iran and many other countries. But freedom of religion only works when people can live without fear of losing their job, hearing racial slurs, or worse. I am proud that this runway is opening up conversations around that issue. Though I have sometimes lost faith in the US, this moment has given me hope. ❤️ ❤️ Swipe through to see the sketches from my amazing designer and friend, @travis_oestreich . And also my original inspiration for this look, which was the “We The People” series by @obeygiant ❤️💙 My photo is once again by the incredible @prestonburford !

A post shared by Jackie Cox (@jackiecoxnyc) on Apr 25, 2020 at 10:02am PDT

"Freedom of religion only works when people can live without fear of losing their job, hearing racial slurs or worse. I am proud that this runway is opening up conversations around that issue. Though I have sometimes lost faith in the U.S., this moment has given me hope," Jackie added.

Jackie told Faris, "I wanted to stand proud and say, 'Here I am, you can wear this too.'"

"For those who believe in the sacredness of a hijab and why that's important, I wanted them to feel empowered and celebrate that part of themselves as well," Jackie said.

"In drag, we celebrate all different kinds of feminine archetypes or feminine standards of beauty and I think a hijab can be beautiful," Jackie said, adding, "It's important to share that message."

"My drag is certainly a celebration of women."

On the topic of drag, Jackie noted in the "Faith Friday" chat that the most misunderstood thing about drag today, is the conception of it as an identity.

"Drag as a pageantry is a misconception," she said. "Drag is a performance, drag is political and drag is as expressive in almost any way you want it to be."

"I love hearing about people's strong connections to faith and I'm open to it all," Jackie told Faris.

In finding an interfaith common ground with others, "the first step is to respect their existence."

"Love and respect means that you see those who are different from you, who don't come from the same school of belief, who don't necessarily express themselves in the same way than you do."

Watch "Faith Friday" live at "Good Morning America" on Instagram every Friday in June for Pride Month and see more at GoodMorningAmerica.com/PRIDE