A special American Airlines flight operated by an all-Black and all-female crew honored aviation pioneer Bessie Coleman on the 100th anniversary of Coleman becoming the first Black woman to pilot a public flight.

Coleman became the first Black and Native American woman to earn a pilot's license back in June 1921 and became the first Black woman to perform a public flight in 1922. The trailblazing pilot had to travel to France to obtain her license when she couldn't do so in the U.S. and returned to perform in air shows in the Chicago region, according to the Transportation Security Administration.

The American Airlines flight from Dallas to Phoenix included 36 crew members, from pilots and flight attendants to gate agents, cargo crew, plane mechanics and even air traffic controllers. They were led by Captain Beth Powell and First Officer Charlene Shortte, both Boeing 737 pilots, according to a news release from the Fort Worth-based carrier published on Friday.

According to the nonprofit group Sisters of the Skies, the flight was especially noteworthy since less than 1% of pilots in the U.S. are Black women.

American Airlines similarly noted a lack of diversity in its release. "Black women have been notably underrepresented in the aviation industry, especially as pilots, representing less than 1% in the commercial airline industry," the company wrote. "Through the American Airlines Cadet Academy, the airline is committed to expanding awareness of and increasing accessibility to the pilot career within diverse communities."

PHOTO: All-Black female crew operates an American Airlines flight from Dallas to Phoenix paying tribute to trailblazer Bessie Coleman, who was the first Black woman to earn a pilot's license in 1921.
Courtesy of American Airlines
All-Black female crew operates an American Airlines flight from Dallas to Phoenix paying tribute to trailblazer Bessie Coleman, who was the first Black woman to earn a pilot's license in 1921.
PHOTO: Pilots that were part of an All-Black female crew that helped operate an American Airlines flight from Dallas to Phoenix paying tribute to trailblazer Bessie Coleman, who was the first Black woman to earn a pilot's license in 1921.
Courtesy of American Airlines
Pilots that were part of an All-Black female crew that helped operate an American Airlines flight from Dallas to Phoenix paying tribute to trailblazer Bessie Coleman, who was the first Black woman to earn a pilot's license in 1921.
PHOTO: Counter staff that were part of an All-Black female crew that helped operate an American Airlines flight from Dallas to Phoenix paying tribute to trailblazer Bessie Coleman, who was the first Black woman to earn a pilot's license in 1921.
Courtesy of American Airlines
Counter staff that were part of an All-Black female crew that helped operate an American Airlines flight from Dallas to Phoenix paying tribute to trailblazer Bessie Coleman, who was the first Black woman to earn a pilot's license in 1921.
PHOTO: Ground crew that were part of an All-Black female crew that helped operate an American Airlines flight from Dallas to Phoenix paying tribute to trailblazer Bessie Coleman, who was the first Black woman to earn a pilot's license in 1921.
Courtesy of American Airlines
Ground crew that were part of an All-Black female crew that helped operate an American Airlines flight from Dallas to Phoenix paying tribute to trailblazer Bessie Coleman, who was the first Black woman to earn a pilot's license in 1921.
PHOTO: A call center employee that was part of an All-Black female crew that helped operate an American Airlines flight from Dallas to Phoenix paying tribute to trailblazer Bessie Coleman, who was the first Black woman to earn a pilot's license in 1921.
Courtesy of American Airlines
A call center employee that was part of an All-Black female crew that helped operate an American Airlines flight from Dallas to Phoenix paying tribute to trailblazer Bessie Coleman, who was the first Black woman to earn a pilot's license in 1921.

Honorary events surrounding the flight involved Gigi Coleman, Coleman's great niece, who said in a promotional video for the airline that she was touched by the carrier's gesture. "I am grateful for American Airlines to give us this opportunity to highlight my great aunt's accomplishments in the field of aviation," Gigi Coleman said.

"I'm beyond thrilled to be a part of the crew where we're inspiring young girls, young girls of color, to see the various roles that these women play in every aspect to make this flight possible," Powell added in the same video.

After the flight, American Airlines pilots and pilot trainees met with students at the Academies at South Mountain in the Phoenix area to spread awareness of and discuss careers in aviation.

Coleman's legacy is set to be honored by the U.S. Mint as well. Earlier this year, the federal agency, a bureau within the U.S. Treasury Department, announced it would feature the aviator on new 2023 quarters, as part of the American Women Quarters Program.