Feeling fancy? Add new flavors and pops of color to your food this summer by using edible flowers.

"Flowers are an amazing product to use whether they are to garnish or used in cooking," Chef Jeffrey Nimer, who owns Haute Chefs Los Angeles, told "GMA." "They not only make the food look pretty and pop for color, you can also taste them."

Edible flowers can be used in drinks, salads, main courses, and desserts. Nimer shared ways to spice up your dishes with marigolds, chamomile, lavender, borage blossoms and more.

PHOTO: Chilean sea bass with spinach, asparagus and edible flowers steeped in sauce.
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Chilean sea bass with spinach, asparagus and edible flowers steeped in sauce.

"There are many different variations to flowers, so knowing what flowers are current for the season is important," he added.

Watch chef Nimer cook with chamomile and marigolds in the video above and then try the recipes below to make them yourself at home for a special and beautiful meal.

Chamomile flower panna cotta

Ingredients:
-2 cups organic heavy cream
-½ cup fresh chamomile flowers with stems and leaves removed
-½ cups sparkler top flowers
-1 cup organic whole milk
-1 ¼ ounce envelope unflavored powdered gelatin
-¼ cups organic honey, like clover or wildflower
-½ tsp vanilla extract
-Pinch of salt

Method:
Lightly grease six-ounce ramekins with a paper towel dipped in a bit of canola orrapeseed oil. Heat the cream in a saucepan set over medium heat until just barelysimmering. Add the chamomile flowers and sparkler tops. Turn off the heat, and letsteep for 20 minutes. Strain the cream through a fine-mesh sieve into a clean bowland reserve.

PHOTO: Panna cotta with chamomile flowers.
ABC News
Panna cotta with chamomile flowers.

Pour the milk into a clean saucepan and sprinkle the gelatin evenly over the top, butdo not stir. Let the gelatin soften until the grains look wet and like they arebeginning to dissolve for about five minutes. After the gelatin has bloomed, warm themilk and gelatin over very low heat, whisking occasionally, until the gelatindissolves for about three to five minutes. Be careful not to let the mixture bubble or simmer, whichwill inhibit the gelatin’s ability to set.

Whisk in the honey, vanilla, and salt. Add the chamomile-infused cream and whisk tocombine. Divide the mixture among the prepared ramekins and chill them in therefrigerator until set, at least four hours and up to overnight. If you are going to leavethem overnight, cover each ramekin with plastic wrap.Top each panna cotta with some more flowers. Alternatively, serve themin their ramekins with the garnishes.

PHOTO: Edible flowers are added to enhance a summer salad.
ABC News
Edible flowers are added to enhance a summer salad.

Butter poached lobster with carrot nage infused with marigold flowers

Ingredients:
-1½ lb Maine Lobster (blanched and shucked)
-2-3 tbsp water
-1 cup (2 sticks) cold butter, cut into 1 tbsp pieces
-Small shallow pot or a saucepan

Method:
In a saucepan, bring two to three tablespoons of water to a simmer over medium heat. Whisk in one tablespoon butter, and when the butter melts, add another piece. Continue adding butter pieces (two sticks total.) Do not let the butter come to a boil or the butter will separate.Try to keep the butter between 160 and 175 degrees Fahrenheit. Use an instant-read thermometer to keep it under 180 Fahrenheit.

PHOTO: Butter poached lobster with edible flower sauce including rose petals and marigolds.
ABC News
Butter poached lobster with edible flower sauce including rose petals and marigolds.

Carrot Nage:
Ingredients:
-1 cup freshly juiced carrots
-1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice
-2 cups chefs' blend mixed flowers
-Olive oil
-Salt & pepper

Method:
In a saucepan, reduce the juices until you have reached the correct consistency, whichshould coat the back of a spoon. In a blender, mix the nage with olive oil and season withsalt and pepper. Strain the flowers and serve with lobster.