Amazon has announced a second Prime event happening next month, just ahead of the busy holiday season.

The retail giant has introduced Amazon Prime's early access sale which will take place Oct. 11-12, making it the first time there will be two Prime events in one year.

The 48-hour shopping event first took place in July and is back to give Prime members exclusive early access to holiday deals across all categories including electronics, fashion, home, kitchen, pets, toys and Amazon devices.

Amazon Prime's early access sale will include deals on big-name brands including Peloton, New Balance, Philips Sonicare and more.

For the first time, the company is also planning to curate a top 100 selection of some of its best deals including offerings from iRobot, KitchenAid and Samsung. Prime members will have the added benefit of shopping up to 80% off select Fire TV smart TVs, as well as additional savings on Alexa-enabled devices and products from Adidas, LEGO, Ashley Furniture and more.

"We are so excited to help Prime members kick off the holiday season with Amazon's new Prime Early Access Sale -- an exclusive opportunity for members to get deep discounts on top brands we know they are looking for this time of year," Jamil Ghani, vice president of Amazon Prime, said in a statement. "And members can start enjoying exclusive Prime benefits and offers now, plus find gift ideas for the family with our holiday gift guides and this year's Toys We Love list."

News of Amazon's fall Prime shopping event follows other retailers rolling out their own early pre-Black Friday sales shopping events.

Target Deal Days is slated to kick off Oct. 6-8 offering thousands of deals on everything from toys and gifts to everyday essentials.

Additionally, Walmart has shared news that the company will be hosting a sales event similar to Amazon and Target, but further details and dates have not yet been confirmed.

Experts agree that these earlier-than-usual sales may be a result of rising inflation.

"First, by starting earlier, retailers are giving holiday shoppers longer durations of time to stretch those paychecks that are already tight," ABC News technology and consumer correspondent Becky Worley said on "Good Morning America."

"Because of inflation, consumers are buying fewer discretionary items like clothing, so expect sales there," she added. "Then, there's the whiplash effect with inventory which was scarce during COVID -- in many cases, now there's too much stock."